Friday, May 17, 2019 - 5:00pm
Type of Event: 
Lecture
Event Location: 
Construction & Engineering Hall

Physicists in African universities are confronted with daunting challenges in their efforts to train students and conduct research.  Many of them are well trained and highly motivated scientists who have chosen to work toward building physics programs in their home countries - in spite of difficult circumstances and meager resources.

Science and technology can play an important role in addressing the critical needs of developing nations in Sub-Saharan Africa. But support for advanced education and research in the physical sciences is very limited in these countries.  A few international organizations have programs that provide some level of support for physics in developing regions, including Africa.  There have also been some efforts to encourage scientific links between physicists in Africa and physicists in other parts of the world.

This presentation will discuss some of my experiences working as a visiting scientist in African universities.  It will also cover some work directed at promoting collaborations and exchanges that connect African scientists and institutions with their counterparts in the U.S. and other developed countries. Such interactions may prove to be important elements in the development of science and technology in Africa.  They might also provide opportunities for scientists in other regions to benefit from the expertise and resourcefulness of African physicists.

**There is a reception at 4 p.m. prior to the lecture at 5 p.m. Free and open to the public.

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